More about Healthy Liverpool

Healthy Liverpool is a plan to make sure that the city’s health and care services meet the needs of the people who use them. The short animation below explains our thinking in more detail.

On this site you can find out more about Healthy Liverpool and make sure your voice is heard by letting us know what you think about the changes being planned.

You can get more information on the five key areas of Healthy Liverpool work by selecting one of the following:



(To turn on subtitles, start playing the video and select "Settings" on the YouTube toolbar which will appear if you hover your mouse over the video. This video is also available in Arabic, Chinese, Somali and Polish.)


Healthy Liverpool is a plan to make sure that the city’s health and care services meet the needs of the people who use them. The short animation below explains our thinking in more detail.

On this site you can find out more about Healthy Liverpool and make sure your voice is heard by letting us know what you think about the changes being planned.

You can get more information on the five key areas of Healthy Liverpool work by selecting one of the following:



(To turn on subtitles, start playing the video and select "Settings" on the YouTube toolbar which will appear if you hover your mouse over the video. This video is also available in Arabic, Chinese, Somali and Polish.)


Latest News

  • New plans for city’s GP services

    5 days ago
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    NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is embarking on a programme to transform access to GP services in the city.

    In April 2016 the CCG introduced a £5.6m investment designed to increase the number of appointments available in practices, which translates to an extra 5,500 appointments across Liverpool every week. Now plans are being drawn up which will mean patients can see a GP between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week, for both routine and urgent problems.

    Later this year there will be a trial of two centres offering extended hours, serving patients from a group of local practices;... Continue reading

    NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) is embarking on a programme to transform access to GP services in the city.

    In April 2016 the CCG introduced a £5.6m investment designed to increase the number of appointments available in practices, which translates to an extra 5,500 appointments across Liverpool every week. Now plans are being drawn up which will mean patients can see a GP between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week, for both routine and urgent problems.

    Later this year there will be a trial of two centres offering extended hours, serving patients from a group of local practices; the intention is that by April 2017 the whole city will be covered by this approach. Work is still underway to determine how appointments will be allocated, but it is likely that patients will access the service via their usual GP practice.

    As part of this ongoing drive to improve access to GP services and simplify the system for patients, the drop-in GP service currently based at Everton Road Health Centre – known as Mersey View – will close on 31 July 2016 (the two GP practices within the Health Centre are unaffected by this change). The decision follows a seven-week public consultation about the closure, which was carried out in 2015. The CCG is working with the GP practices to ensure a smooth transition to the new system. Patients who might previously have used Mersey View will be able to access extra appointments with their own GP, made possible by the CCG’s extra investment, or be referred by their practice to a GP at a new extended hours centre, one of which will be in north Liverpool.

    Dr Rosie Kaur is a GP and clinical lead for primary care at NHS Liverpool CCG. She said: “As part of Healthy Liverpool we’ve done a lot of work with patients to understand what they want from local NHS services, and we know that for some people getting an appointment with a GP remains an issue.

    “The city’s 93 practices are putting in place extra appointments, and we’re working with them to ensure that the way appointments are booked makes the most of what is available. For example, some practices have found that if patients have an initial phone conversation with a GP before a face-to-face appointment is made, a significant number of problems can be resolved without the need for a practice visit. This is more efficient for patients and frees up consultations for those who really need them.

    “At the same time we’re looking at how we make GP services available between 8am and 8pm, seven days a week, by creating hubs where patients can see a GP even if their own practice doesn’t have an appointment available.

    “There’s still plenty of work to do and we’ll be continuing our conversations with patients as plans develop, but we think that these developments offer us the chance to make a real difference to how people in Liverpool access their GP.”

    Delivering GP services 8am to 8pm, seven days a week, will mean extended access for routine GP appointments. This will not affect the current GP Out of Hours service.

    For more information about services members of the public can call Healthwatch Liverpool on 0300 77 77 007 or email enquiries@healthwatchliverpool.co.uk.


  • Beat the Street launches!

    13 days ago
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    Liverpool is set to play host to an exciting six-week game called Beat the Street – a challenge that encourages participants to walk, cycle and run as far as possible within their local community, in their own time.

    The free challenge was launched on Friday 13 May at Anfield Road Primary School with staff and pupils plus representatives from the local community, as well as children from All Saint’s Primary School.

    Beat the Street will turn Liverpool into a real-life game where residents are challenged to form or join a team and see how far they can walk, cycle or... Continue reading

    Liverpool is set to play host to an exciting six-week game called Beat the Street – a challenge that encourages participants to walk, cycle and run as far as possible within their local community, in their own time.

    The free challenge was launched on Friday 13 May at Anfield Road Primary School with staff and pupils plus representatives from the local community, as well as children from All Saint’s Primary School.

    Beat the Street will turn Liverpool into a real-life game where residents are challenged to form or join a team and see how far they can walk, cycle or run within the timeframe. Participants will be able to log their journey by tapping cards or “fobs” against special sensors called Beat Boxes, which will be found on lampposts across the area.

    See what Beat the Street participants in Hertforshire have to say:


    Tracey Williams, assistant head at All Saints Catholic Primary School, said: “At All Saints we seek to promote health and exercise throughout key stages. The children are enthusiastic and excited to be a part of the Beat the Street initiative and can't wait to start to use their fobs.”

    The game starts in the Liverpool North cluster on Wednesday, 18 May and takes place until 29 June covering the wards of Anfield, Everton and Kirkdale. A second competition within the southern half of the city will take place from 8 June to 20 July.

    The competition has been resourced through a partnership between Liverpool City Council, NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group and strategic stakeholders, with the aim of encouraging people to adopt a more active lifestyle and to continue being more active beyond the end of the competition.

    Dr Maurice Smith, GP and member of NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group’s Governing Body, said: “Being more active is the single most effective way to improve our physical and mental health and, at the moment, Liverpool is behind other parts of the country when it comes to being active.

    “Being active doesn’t have to mean joining the gym or running a half marathon. You can make a difference by building more movement into your daily life – taking part in Beat the Street is a great place to start moving more. Even small amounts of activity can make a huge difference to how we feel and help prevent illnesses such as heart disease and cancer, as well as easing the symptoms of long-term conditions such as diabetes and lung disease.”

    The game is part of Healthy Liverpool – a five-year programme to improve health locally. Helping people reap the benefits of moving more is central to Healthy Liverpool. It is also part of Liverpool’s Physical Activity and Sport Strategy 2014-21 which sets out the vision for Liverpool to be the most active city in England by 2021.

    Assistant Mayor Councillor Wendy Simon, said: “We’re very excited about launching this fun initiative which will help local people become more active and gain some real benefits.”

    There are two leader boards and fantastic prizes for the top three teams that travel the furthest and also those teams that clock up the highest average points per person. There is also the chance to win weekly ‘lucky tap’ prizes just for taking part. People of all ages can take part and players can win prizes for themselves and their community team.

    For more information about Beat the Street, visit www.liverpoolnorth.beatthestreet.me or follow Beat the Street on Twitter and Facebook.

  • Could you be a physical activity champion?

    19 days ago
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    In July, Healthy Liverpool will be launching a city-wide physical activity campaign with the aim of getting as many people as possible in the city active.

    We want Liverpool to be the most active city in the country and we need your help to do it.

    The campaign will focus on all of you, real people from the city sharing stories about how and why you became more active, and how being active has improved your lives.

    By sharing these stories we want to inspire and motivate people from across the city, so we can start an active movement to... Continue reading

    In July, Healthy Liverpool will be launching a city-wide physical activity campaign with the aim of getting as many people as possible in the city active.

    We want Liverpool to be the most active city in the country and we need your help to do it.

    The campaign will focus on all of you, real people from the city sharing stories about how and why you became more active, and how being active has improved your lives.

    By sharing these stories we want to inspire and motivate people from across the city, so we can start an active movement to get Liverpool moving!

    We’re looking to bring together an army of campaign champions, of all abilities, to help us motivate the city.

    If you would like to find out more contact communications@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.


  • What happens next for Healthy Liverpool?

    about 1 month ago
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    The most recent engagement period for Healthy Liverpool came to a close on Wednesday 23 March 2016.

    Since the start of February, we had been asking for your views on hospital services, GP and community services, urgent and emergency care, physical activity and digital care and innovation.

    During that time we received hundreds of responses to our online surveys and discussion forums, and many of you also attended at least one of the events we held during those two months. Thank you to everyone who took part.

    We are now going through all of the feedback... Continue reading

    The most recent engagement period for Healthy Liverpool came to a close on Wednesday 23 March 2016.

    Since the start of February, we had been asking for your views on hospital services, GP and community services, urgent and emergency care, physical activity and digital care and innovation.

    During that time we received hundreds of responses to our online surveys and discussion forums, and many of you also attended at least one of the events we held during those two months. Thank you to everyone who took part.

    We are now going through all of the feedback we received and will report back in August/September 2016.

    Keep checking back for the latest updates and details of how you can have your say. Don't forget you can follow Healthy Liverpool on Twitter and Facebook.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.

  • Have your say by Wednesday 23 March

    2 months ago
    Hlp_logo

    Since the start of February 2016, we have been inviting the people of Liverpool to share their views on plans to improve healthcare in the city as part of Healthy Liverpool.

    If you haven’t had your say yet, make sure you get in touch by 5pm on Wednesday 23 March 2016.

    We have created a number of surveys and discussion forums on the following topics:

    Once the surveys and discussion forums are closed, we will spend time analysing the... Continue reading

    Since the start of February 2016, we have been inviting the people of Liverpool to share their views on plans to improve healthcare in the city as part of Healthy Liverpool.

    If you haven’t had your say yet, make sure you get in touch by 5pm on Wednesday 23 March 2016.

    We have created a number of surveys and discussion forums on the following topics:

    Once the surveys and discussion forums are closed, we will spend time analysing the feedback we have been given and use this to develop our plans further.

    We will be doing more engagement later this year so make sure you keep an eye on our website for more details of how you can get involved. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.


  • Blog: What do you do when you urgently need the NHS?

    3 months ago
    Fiona_lemmens

    Urgent and emergency care services are for when you have a health problem which requires immediate attention, whether it’s a minor injury or a life-threatening emergency. These services are a crucial part of our health care system and we depend on them to be there when we need them.

    It’s important to understand the distinction between “urgent” and “emergency”. Emergency care services are for when you have a serious or life-threatening illness or injury and should go to Accident and Emergency (A&E) immediately, while urgent care services are for when your illness or injury is not life-threatening but you cannot... Continue reading

    Urgent and emergency care services are for when you have a health problem which requires immediate attention, whether it’s a minor injury or a life-threatening emergency. These services are a crucial part of our health care system and we depend on them to be there when we need them.

    It’s important to understand the distinction between “urgent” and “emergency”. Emergency care services are for when you have a serious or life-threatening illness or injury and should go to Accident and Emergency (A&E) immediately, while urgent care services are for when your illness or injury is not life-threatening but you cannot wait to be seen routinely.

    Urgent and emergency care is provided by a range of different services, including your GP, pharmacies, NHS 111, walk-in centres, the GP out of hours service, 999 and A&E departments.

    That’s a lot to choose from and we know people sometimes struggle to decide which service is right for them. This often leads to people choosing what appears to be the easiest option – the local A&E - rather than the most appropriate service for their needs.

    But if you go to A&E with a fairly minor concern, you can sometimes find yourself with a lengthy wait on your hands while more seriously ill people are seen before you. We know this can be frustrating but it needn’t be as there are so many alternatives available.

    We want to make it easier to find your way around urgent and emergency care services, so you can be confident that you are getting the right care, in the right place, at the right time.

    In some cases this might mean changing the way patients access services. For example, we are looking at whether Urgent Care Centres, which offer a wide range of services under one roof for conditions that aren’t life-threatening, could be a good solution for patients in Liverpool.

    In other cases, it might mean doing more with what we already have. For example, it’s thought that around 80% of health conditions could be treated at home, so we’re looking at how we can promote tools like the NHS Choices website, the NHS 111 phone service and the expert care and advice available at local pharmacies, so you know where to get extra support and information when it makes sense for you to deal with an illness or injury yourself.

    We know some people have problems getting an appointment with their GP, so we’re working to improve this. We’re also looking at how the ambulance service can play a greater role in providing treatment without the need for a hospital visit (see the video below for more on this), and directing people to more suitable services if it’s found that a paramedic isn’t actually required.

    Our urgent and emergency care services are what we rely on in times of need, usually when we are at our most anxious and vulnerable, so we want to make sure we get this right and that we shape our service to meet the needs of you, the people of Liverpool. To do this we need to hear your views, which you can share by completing our survey or attending one of our events.

    By Dr Fiona Lemmens, GP and Clinical Director for Urgent and Emergency Care at NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.


  • Blog: Using technology to transform healthcare in Liverpool

    3 months ago
    Dr_simon_bowers

    Healthy Liverpool gives us an opportunity to realise the enormous potential that technology can bring to local health services and the people who depend on them.

    Our aim is for Liverpool to have one of the most digitally advanced health and social care services in Europe by 2020.

    The city has been leading the way for a number of years now and we have already made great progress in using technology to support our patients to live more independently, and also to improve communication between different health and social care services.

    By using digital technology, we can provide services more... Continue reading

    Healthy Liverpool gives us an opportunity to realise the enormous potential that technology can bring to local health services and the people who depend on them.

    Our aim is for Liverpool to have one of the most digitally advanced health and social care services in Europe by 2020.

    The city has been leading the way for a number of years now and we have already made great progress in using technology to support our patients to live more independently, and also to improve communication between different health and social care services.

    By using digital technology, we can provide services more quickly and efficiently, and also get better results for our patients. In some cases it is also helping people avoid unnecessary hospital admissions.

    One of the priorities for us is to integrate health and social care records. This means that no matter which service you use – whether it’s the GP, a hospital, community nurse or the ambulance service - the people providing your care will have immediate access to the most up to date information about your health, such as any allergies or medication you take. This means they can quickly make the best decisions for you and make sure your treatment is as safe and effective as possible. In an emergency, this can mean the difference between life and death. You can learn more about this by watching this short film:


    We are also working on a system that will allow you to build a personal “profile” of your health. Many people already do this to an extent, whether it’s using an app on their mobile phone or tablet device to monitor how many steps they take, how far they’ve run, or what food and drink they’ve consumed.

    We want to create something that can bring all of this together but that is also linked to your health conditions. For example, if you have a long term condition like diabetes, asthma or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease (COPD), you can record your test results on your app to keep an eye on how you’re doing. If you choose to, this information can be shared with the health service, which can respond accordingly, whether it’s offering advice on how to manage your condition or booking an appointment if they notice something in your results that is worth exploring further.

    Using technology to support people to live more independently is another area we will increasingly be focusing on. At the moment, for example, we have patients with arthritis who are concerned about what will happen if they fall. We are able to provide an intercom system which is accessed by a wristband, so the patient can connect with a friendly voice who is ready to help in the event of a fall. This simple piece of technology provides peace of mind and confidence to patients, their families and their carers.

    We want you to tell us how you think technology could be used to support your health and independence. But we also know that technology can be scary if you’ve not used it before, so also get in touch if you think you would need some help with this.

    We’ve created a discussion forum here where you can share your thoughts and comments, so we can use technology to help create a Healthy Liverpool for everyone.

    By Dr Simon Bowers, GP, Clinical Director of Digital Innovation and Vice Chair at NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.


  • Blog: Help us shape the future of Liverpool hospital services

    3 months ago
    Donal.portrait-3

    One of the aims of Healthy Liverpool is for people in the city to have the very best hospital services and to receive the same high standard of care wherever they are treated.

    Liverpool has a relatively large number of hospitals and, while there is a lot of excellent care being provided, there are times when services are duplicated and standards vary depending where you are treated.

    We want teams who work for different hospitals but cover the same specialities to work more closely together for the benefit of patients.

    In some cases, we think it might make sense for... Continue reading

    One of the aims of Healthy Liverpool is for people in the city to have the very best hospital services and to receive the same high standard of care wherever they are treated.

    Liverpool has a relatively large number of hospitals and, while there is a lot of excellent care being provided, there are times when services are duplicated and standards vary depending where you are treated.

    We want teams who work for different hospitals but cover the same specialities to work more closely together for the benefit of patients.

    In some cases, we think it might make sense for services to be provided at one hospital by one team. In other cases, it might mean that services continue to be provided at the same number of hospitals but by one team of people rather than several separate teams.

    We believe patients will enjoy a more consistently high standard of care if hospitals work more closely together.

    We also think it will strengthen the city’s ability to develop cutting-edge treatments and, by building on our already strong relationships with the city’s universities, we can create an environment where clinical research and development can thrive.

    This will attract new investment and clinical expertise to Liverpool, which is good for the city, and good for the people who use the local NHS.

    So what could greater collaboration between specialist teams in hospitals look like for patients?

    One area we are currently looking at is cardiology – the area of medicine concerned with the heart. At the moment Liverpool has separate cardiology services at the Royal Liverpool Hospital, Aintree Hospital and Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, but what if there could be one cardiology team serving the whole city?

    This partnership approach would mean patients would receive a more consistent standard of care, no matter where they were treated. It would also mean the team could arrange its work rota so more services were available seven days a week.

    Another example where change could benefit patients is upper GI (gastro intestinal) cancer surgery - cancers in the stomach or oesophagus. Currently, about 20% of patients with upper GI cancer have surgery as part of their treatment. The remaining 80% have other treatments, like chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

    This means upper GI surgery is performed around 150 times each year and, at the moment, these surgeries are performed at two hospitals by two separate teams. If they worked as one team, and carried out all the operations in one hospital, patients would get better outcomes. This is because the people performing this complex surgery would have more experience because they would be doing it more often.

    Hospitals are not just about services that are provided under one roof; increasingly they will also provide specialist care and treatment outside of hospital, working with GPs and community services to provide the best care, closer to home. You can read more about this work in the GP and Community Healthcare section here.

    A key principle which will underpin changes introduced as part of Healthy Liverpool is to provide services locally to you wherever possible, but in one central place if this means your treatment will be better as a result.

    It’s really important that we hear what you think about these plans. We need to know if you would be prepared to travel a bit further, if it meant getting better care, and what services would you prefer to keep local, if possible.

    Healthy Liverpool is your opportunity to help change the way that hospital services in the city are provided, to create a system where all patients receive excellent care, no matter where they are treated. You can have your say online, by completing a short survey, or be attending one of our public events, details of which are here.

    By Professor Donal O’Donoghue, Hospital Consultant, and a member of NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group’s Governing Body.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.


  • Blog: Improving your wellbeing through community services

    3 months ago
    Dr_janet_bliss

    We have some fantastic community services in Liverpool, but at the moment they can be quite disjointed and we think people would benefit if services worked more closely together.

    When I talk about community services, I mean GP practices, walk in centres, district nurses and other services you receive outside of hospital.

    To help bring these services together, we will be developing Community Care Teams. These teams will include GPs, nurses, social workers, mental health teams, pharmacists and other care professionals who will work together to make sure the right care is available when and where you need it.

    Delivering... Continue reading

    We have some fantastic community services in Liverpool, but at the moment they can be quite disjointed and we think people would benefit if services worked more closely together.

    When I talk about community services, I mean GP practices, walk in centres, district nurses and other services you receive outside of hospital.

    To help bring these services together, we will be developing Community Care Teams. These teams will include GPs, nurses, social workers, mental health teams, pharmacists and other care professionals who will work together to make sure the right care is available when and where you need it.

    Delivering services in this way will help vulnerable people and those with complex needs. It means we can better identify who needs support and help them get the right care.

    We think this approach will support people to stay well for longer; so far it’s gone really well when we’ve tested it in some parts of the city.

    Linked to this, we know there are a lot of activities already going on in the community which have a really positive impact on people’s health, and we want to do more to work with these groups and promote healthy living as widely as possible.

    When we spoke to people last summer about Healthy Liverpool, one of the clear messages coming back was that people sometimes struggle to get a GP appointment, or the appointment system doesn’t work for them.

    We are planning to extend opening hours seven days a week at some GP practices across Liverpool and make these extended appointment times available to everyone, not just patients registered at that practice.

    A lot of people in Liverpool are living with long-term health conditions, like diabetes, different types of cancers and lung problems. Many of these patients have to make regular trips to hospital to see the doctor or nurse who helps manage their condition, but we think a lot of this work can be done outside of hospital and in community settings closer to home.

    We also want to put more things in place, like information and education, to support people to manage their long-term conditions better. There is evidence that this extra support leads to an improved quality of life and fewer emergency trips to hospital.

    There are groups of people in the city who we know are more likely to become unwell. For example, we know that the homeless and people with alcohol problems are more likely to need our help. We want to explore different ways of working with these groups to support and care for them better.

    We want to create community services that meet the needs of Liverpool, and to do that we need to hear from you.

    We’ve created two online surveys where you can share your views, and we are holding a number of public events in February and March. Details of all of these are available at www.healthyliverpool.nhs.uk.

    By Dr Janet Bliss, GP and Clinical Director of Community Services.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.



  • Blog: Help us help you to be more active

    4 months ago
    Dr_maurice_smith

    We have an ambitious goal and we need your help to reach it. We want Liverpool to be the most active major city outside London by 2021.

    We’ve set ourselves this goal because being more active is the single most effective way to improve our physical and mental health and, at the moment, Liverpool is well behind other parts of the country when it comes to being active.

    When I talk about being active, it doesn’t have to mean joining the gym or running a half marathon. It might mean making smaller and more realistic changes to your routine, like... Continue reading

    We have an ambitious goal and we need your help to reach it. We want Liverpool to be the most active major city outside London by 2021.

    We’ve set ourselves this goal because being more active is the single most effective way to improve our physical and mental health and, at the moment, Liverpool is well behind other parts of the country when it comes to being active.

    When I talk about being active, it doesn’t have to mean joining the gym or running a half marathon. It might mean making smaller and more realistic changes to your routine, like taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting off the bus one stop early or walking to the shops instead of driving.

    That might sound almost too easy but even small amounts of activity – which won’t cost you a penny - can make a huge difference to how we feel and help prevent illnesses such as heart disease and cancer, as well as easing the symptoms of long-term conditions such as diabetes and lung disease.

    When we held conversations with the people of Liverpool last summer, as part of Healthy Liverpool, a lot of you talked about mental health.

    There’s evidence to show that being active leads to an improved sense of wellbeing and causes chemical changes in the brain, which can improve our mood and self-esteem. So this isn’t just about our physical fitness, it will help us feel better mentally too.

    Part of our work will involve encouraging employers to help their staff be more active during the workday and we’ll be providing grants to community groups which can support people to get moving.

    But we also need to hear from you so we can get a clear picture of what kind of activities you currently do and what we can do to support you to do even more.

    And if you aren’t currently active – and a lot of us aren’t, for various reasons – then we need to understand why that is and what would help you to incorporate some physical activity into your daily life.

    To make this as easy as possible for you, we’ve created a short online survey which should take no more than ten minutes to complete.

    We have also created a community map of the best places to be active in Liverpool, which we hope will inspire you to try something new. If you’ve got any suggestions which you think others might enjoy then you can add them to the map directly.

    This is all available on the Healthy Liverpool website here.

    Let’s work together and get Liverpool moving – we’ll all feel so much better for it.

    By Dr Maurice Smith, a GP at Mather Avenue surgery in Allerton and Clinical Director for Healthy Liverpool’s ‘Living Well’ project.

    To sign up for more information about Healthy Liverpool, click here, email involvement@liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or call 0151 296 7537.